Top 10 Christmas Wish List 2011

Please take a peek as the first “Top 3″ items won’t take a bite out of your money budget – Just a small bite out of your time budget!

  1. Share the Different iz Good website , Facebook page – facebook.com/DifferentizGood and our Gift a Voice Project with your online community.
  2. Donate any used cell phone, smart phone, iPhone, iPod Touch or iPad for the Foundation’s Gift a Voice Project.
  3. Host a Gift a Voice Cell Phone Drive.
  4. Apple Gift Cards
  5. iTunes Gift Cards
  6. Amazon Gift Cards
  7. New iPod Touch or iPad
  8. Buy stuff from the Different iz Good store
  9. Cash Donations – Any Amount (Cash, Credit Card or PayPal)
  10. Sponsor a person with communication disabilities:

Approximately $600 will buy one NEW iPod Touch, Proloquo2Go (or similar) AAC Application, iMainGo speaker/case or similar and a cover (exact cost will depend on needs of recipient).

Approximately $1,200 will buy one NEW iPad, Proloquo2Go (or similar) AAC Application,  speaker and a case/cover (exact cost will depend on needs of recipient).

If you’d like more information about our Wish List items please comment below, comment on our Facebook Page or send an email to list @ differentizgood . org.

Different is Love

(Guest post by Susan Moran –Learn more about Susan by visiting our Contributors Page)

(©2009 Artwork by Lillian Darnell - All Rights Reserved)

Different is Love

Different is learning love is like a rainbow:

Full of colors and joy-
Full of experiences that upon memory are as colorful as a rainbow,
Full of expectations that upon collaboration are as colorful as a rainbow;
even though the collaboration changes the expectations beyond imagining sometimes,
Full of joy for all of the differences that no one could have predicted and yes, these joys are as colorful as a rainbow.
Different is learning love is like a rainbow, very colorful and full of mystery and joy.

Kaleidoscope

My journey with my darling daughter is like a kaleidoscope. It is a mixture of emotions at levels never before experienced or even imagined. She has taught me that love is joy. Different levels of joy and excitement over “small” things that others take for granted.

These joys occur on HER time table, not on the schedule from some developmental chart or some doctor or teacher’s notion of when is “right” for it to occur.

Love is those first independent steps that we had to wait an “extra year and a few months” for her to take.

Love is the pride that beams from every fiber of her being and through her soul when she “gets it” whatever the latest it is!

Love is the sheer, pure joy when my darling finally, after years of trying, jumps over that yellow bar at PT.

Love is knowing when to whoop and holler at her success and when to celebrate quietly so as not to interrupt the moment for her.

This kaleidoscope love of mine is wonderful. It is so full of color that changes and mixes and is constantly in flux.

I am blessed to have a kaleidoscope love child. Are you?

{Wanna share this with your Facebook Friends? Feel free to “like” it below and share with them by pressing here! Thanks y’all -Camilla}

About Guest Blogger

This post was written by a guest contributor.  Please see their details on our Contributors page.  If you’d like to guest post for Different iz Good check out our Write for DIG page for details about how YOU can share your stories and tips with our community.

Thoughts from a Momentary Perspective

(Guest post by Sara Jackson Johnson –  Sara blogs at Sara in Between)

Sara Jackson and her Family

I’ve been struggling with some genetic results I received this week for my youngest, which told us that in fact he has two rather than just the one extremely rare genetic disorder. I’m pretty sure this takes him from one in few thousand to one perhaps on his own and while that’s kind of cool, it’s also quite lonely from where I’m sitting, not yet with the head space to learn the new stuff.

So I’ve done some hibernating, ruminating and finally blog-style tantruming and now I’m quietly trying to calm my feelings.

What has helped is catching up on an amazing TV programme shown here in England on BBC1. It was about surgeons at the Oxford Craniofacial Unit who use their skill to operate on children with disorders, malformations and life-threatening conditions affecting their skulls and faces.

These amazing professionals are leaders in their field, with extraordinary skills and techniques and the stamina to perform 7 hour operations. They are artists in helping to break and reform bones in the skull to allow room for brains, to help attach muscles to allow a smile reflex, to perform an extraordinary operation, then attach a brace and turn it a milimetre a day to gradually change the shape of a head and reduce pressure in the brain. What they do in these operations somehow didn’t seem gruesome, because of the humanity with which they held themselves, and the effect is nothing short of miraculous.
What is amazing is that they carry out their duties with an amazing humility and kindness, knowing that what they are doing is saving lives, but also helping people to look less different. To feel less obvious and blend a little more and as such have a slightly easier time of life.

What really struck me was something that the one of the surgeons said and understood about his patients. That parents struggle with these huge decisions while their children are young and have no choice when things are life threatening. But at some point these children become older and often decide that enough is enough. After countless operations the danger is over and only the cosmetic remains which is why some of them arrive at the conclusion that they are who they are. Job done.

I watched with admiration and tears at the humanity of these surgeons, the strength and pain of the parents and the amazing resilience of these kids.

Still days after I’ve watched them I’m carrying around the lessons that they didn’t know they were teaching me when they agreed to be filmed by for once what appeared to be an emotionally intelligent TV crew.

Difference and all it embodies is often far too complicated to put into words, but today to help me concentrate on renewing my perspective, I’ve enjoyed looking around the edges.

{Did you enjoy this post? Feel free to “like” it below and share with your Facebook Friends by pressing here! Thanks y’all -Camilla}

About Guest Blogger

This post was written by a guest contributor.  Please see their details on our Contributors page.  If you’d like to guest post for Different iz Good check out our Write for DIG page for details about how YOU can share your stories and tips with our community.

Just a little girl

(Guest post by Alisha Marie Peters – Alisha blogs at The Moments That Change Everything)

I know this blog’s mission is to empower difference, which I am all for… but at the same time; I’m starting to see that my girl is so much like any other 3-year-old girl in so many ways.

Don’t get me wrong, she is different in a lot of ways, but the beauty is, I don’t think she sees that yet. And just this once, I’m not going to focus on what makes her different, even though I love all of her. I’m so proud of who she is and all that she’s accomplished with so much stacked against her, and I really hope she grows up knowing that. And that she embraces who she is, all of who she is, and knows how truly amazing she really is.

But, this time I want to let the world know that in most aspects, my girl is just like yours.

But really, just in the last little while I’ve seen enormous strides in her development, and I’m seeing just a 3 year old girl… just that, a little girl doing things that all little girls do. She hates having her hair done. She loves her independence. She loves school and all her friends there. She is a daddy’s girl through and through. She loves dolls and Minnie Mouse. She laughs at things that are funny, some that I’m even surprised she gets! She loves attention, but at the same time can be really shy until she really gets to know someone. She doesn’t really care for goodbyes. She can throw some amazing diva-esc temper tantrums over not getting her way! And she has an attitude that is much bigger than she is!

And the thing that inspired this whole post, she loves… and I can’t stress that word enough, loves Tangled!! She got it for Easter, and I’m sure has watched it entirely through over 20 times in that short week and a half. She loves the whole thing, but definitely has her favorite parts and songs. Now you may not understand why I think this is such a big thing, or why I’m happy about it. But you see this is something that I thought would never happen for my little girl. I would hear people complain about having to watch this show or that over and over, and secretly I would think how lucky they were that their child had made such an important connection. And I’ll admit that I wasn’t sure if mine ever would.

So yes, I’m “Tangled out” I guess you could say, but I’m so, so happy…. Ecstatic really. I love that she is just a girl some days. She’s a happy, always smiling, wanting her way kind of girl. Didn’t I just describe every 3-year-old diva in America??

Em laying on her butterfly pillow with her favorite doll, watching Tangled

{Like this post? Feel free to “like” it below and share with your Facebook Friends by pressing here! Thanks y’all -Camilla}

About Guest Blogger

This post was written by a guest contributor.  Please see their details on our Contributors page.  If you’d like to guest post for Different iz Good check out our Write for DIG page for details about how YOU can share your stories and tips with our community.

Gift a Voice FUNdraiser – Vino for Voices

Whose ready to have some FUN while at the same time raising money for the Turning Views Foundation, Different iz Good and Gift a Voice?

Clark is our next Gift a Voice Recipient

We’ve got a great time scheduled for Wednesday, March 30th, from 6-8 pm at Kona Gold Coffee and Wine Bar y’all! An informal night of fun, wine, chocolate (Dorinda’s Chocolates to be exact!! YUM) and appetizers.

March 30, 2011, 6:00 – 8:00 p.m.
Kona Gold Coffee & Wine Bar
3304 South McCarran Blvd Reno

Over TWENTY FIVE donations for our over the top awesome raffle!  Ranging from Jewelry to Gift Certificates to Wine to Oil Changes to Massages to Bread Baskets to Chocolate to Limousine services to Dental Exams to Books to Chiropractic Exams and all things in between!!

100% of the event fee goes to our Gift a Voice project.  Kona Gold is donating the space, the wine and the appetizers and Dorinda’s Chocolates is donating the chocolate.  Kona Gold is also donating all their tips for the night to our Foundation!!

Bring your inactive and used iPhones, smart phones and cell phones for donation to our Cell Phone Recycling for a Voice Drive.  Receive (1) One FREE raffle ticket for each phone donated.

Join us and support those in our lives with special needs and those with communication disabilities!

Help us spread the word about our Vino for Voices event by sharing with your Facebook Community and pressing that little ole “Like” button below!! We appreciate it times a million y’all!!

(After check out please print your PayPal receipt as that is your ticket to “taste”!!)


Sponsored and hosted by:

Delicious Mouth Watering Chocolate Provided by:

Bring Your Smile ‘Cause Photography Provided by:

Filming Provided By:

Trashion Show



Thank you to Veronica Coleman of Magic 95.5 Wake Up Call for hosting a Cell Phone Recycling Drive for our Gift a Voice program in conjunction with The Trashion Show tonight, Friday, March 25, 2011.

Veronica recycles used items and creates handmade designs that she sells under the name Reno Upcycle.  Trashion Show will feature everything from the everyday to the obscure designed by Veronica, Lauren Gifford and Kimberly Phipps-Nichol (a Different iz Good Board of Director).

Hope to see any of you local folks there tonight! Kimberly also talked Camilla into being a model for her, so she will be wearing a couple of Kimberly’s designs! Oh my!!

Check out the Reno Tahoe Tonight article to learn more about Veronica and the Trashion Show (Page 74).

Acceptance of Different

(Guest post by Susan Moran –Learn more about Susan by visiting our Contributors Page)

There are many things to accept in this world. We must accept different people, different cultures, different religions, different points of view, different methods of accomplishing tasks, different schedules, expectations, rules, directions, likes and dislikes and the list goes on and on and on.

In our house, one darling really needs help with accepting different expectations and different methods of accomplishing tasks. She likes sameness—it is comforting to know how and when things will be done. However, as stated above, this is NOT how life really works. So, I am challenged daily to help her embrace and enjoy flexibility. 🙂 To this end, I made up a song/chant with her in the car the other day.

I wrote a song to help IM deal with adjusting her evening schedule to include sitter time. She loves her sitter but still struggles with differences in routines and how things are done. All things should be done Momma’s way, don’t you know?! 🙂 So, here it is.

Izzy’s way, Izzy’s way
I like to do it Izzy’s way
Sometimes it’s dif-fer-ent,
But that’s O. K.,
I LIKE to do it Izzy’s way.

We also talk about how this song can help at school, at PT, at doctor’s appts, where ever things are different—we can sing this song and make it a good day. 🙂 It helped that night and another night too. 🙂

I bet you know some one who could use flexibility training too. 🙂

What will you do today to embrace, celebrate or help some one with differences?

(We would love to hear your thoughts in the Comment section and if you’d like to share with your friends on Facebook, just press here! – Thanks y’all –Camilla!)

Symbiosis

(Guest post by Sara Jackson Johnson –  Sara blogs at Sara in Between)

I walk past this image at least once a day in the park at the end of my street .  I could take a more direct route through to the tube station, but always find my feet walking me this way.  This morning I realised it was time to pen a small note to work out why.


What I see here is intricate and interesting and kind of wrong in the middle of a park full of neat, planned and ordered foliage.  It strikes me every day and I have thought more than once about stopping the park keeper to ask how long it has been there?  Whether the ivy affects the health of the tree?  Is that a stump it’s growing on?  Whether they ever think about cutting it down and releasing the tree of its needy interloper? Or which of them actually came first?

But I never do. Not just because I think the park keeper hates me. You see unlike the other gardeners there with whom I have a happy hello-filled acquaintance, he either avoids my eye with no great subtlety or gives me a grudging smile if he absolutely has to…Anyway, I digress….

I don’t ask because I just love it as it is.  Love that I don’t really know whether it is a stump covered in ivy, opportunistically grabbing onto a tree that was unfortunate to be standing right next to it.  Or that the new tree was planted next to an old thing and they’ve developed a symbiotic need and love for each other.  I love that it makes me slow down, often stop, just to look across and down and up to see whether I can see the join.  Whether the tree is behaving as it should and marvelling at the sheer tenacity of that ivy.

I even enjoy the comparisons I find and the images it puts in my head; about me, my son, his DNA, what a pretty way to see something uninvited become so very…necessary somehow.

However I mostly love that in this picture, the sun is shining down on them both, as it does on us all.  Plain or startling, boring or exciting, healthy or wizened, different or the same.  Not how anyone planned it I’m sure, but glorious nonetheless.

Giving Sam a Voice

(Guest post by Monica McDivitt – Monica blogs at Like a Butterfly)

The Internet, Facebook and computers have been quite a gift to me. Some might criticize and complain that people share too much information or spend too much time “playing” on the Internet but the ability to form new friendships, network with other groups and families of children with and without disabilities, find resources and research from the comfort of my own home have all become invaluable to me. After all, this is how I met Camilla Downs, founder of The Turning Views Foundation and the Different Iz Good™ (DIG) movement and how I was given the privilege to be a contributor for her incredible mission.

Over the past few months, I have been exploring alternative ways to help my 10 year-old daughter, Samantha, to communicate. Sam was born with a chromosome 18q- deletion. As a result she has intellectual and developmental disabilities. Sam is also Deaf, nonverbal and her delayed fine motor skills do not allow her to hold a crayon without assistance.

Sam understands some American Sign Language but has not learned to sign consistently. If she does sign, her sign language is very subtle and if you blink, you will probably miss it. My husband, John, and I have tried several tools and devices over the years to help Sam communicate and participate in her daily and extracurricular activities – the Picture Exchange Communication System (PECS), object schedules and my own pictures with ASL signs are just a few.

In my first DIG contribution I wrote, “Do I wish Sam could speak? Would I love to hear her beautiful voice? You bet! For now, I get giggles, babbles, cries and gestures and if this is all I ever receive as far as communication, I can be happy.” I am true to Sam and still believe everything I wrote but I also know that Sam is an extremely bright child and she really makes me think…a lot! One day, recently, I was playing with Sam, speaking directly into her ear. In a sing-songy voice I kept repeating, “I love you.” Sam sat and listened attentively. She was incredibly engaged and when I least expected it and with a big smile on her face, I heard her vocalize “Ah la la.” I heard Sam say, “I love you” and I suddenly began to want more!

Success stories of the iPad being used with children who have disabilities have been popping up all over the local and world news: A recent New York Times article described the story of 7-year-old Owen Cain who has had a debilitating motor-neuron disease since infancy: “He does not have the strength to use a computer mouse but when a nurse propped her boyfriend’s iPad within reach in June, he did something his mother had never seen before. [Owen] aimed his left pointer finger at an icon on the screen, touched it — just barely — and opened the application Gravitarium, which plays music as users create landscapes of stars on the screen. Over the years, Owen’s parents had tried several computerized communications contraptions to give him an escape from his disability, but the iPad was the first that worked on the first try.”

When I read about and saw this story, I cried, thought about Sam and began to believe that she could be just as successful as Owen. Clearly, Sam’s disabilities are much different than Owen’s but, still, I immediately researched for more stories and articles and then purchased and downloaded the popular communication applications recommended by Camilla onto John’s iPad so we could present this information to Sam’s IEP (Individualized Education Plan) team. I felt so happy.

At our meeting John and I brought the iPad to demonstrate its greatness and how we wanted to help Sam to communicate. The team was impressed, but the reasons against the use of the iPad for Sam at school were: The district won’t allow it. Assistive Technology does not provide support for iPads. What if it breaks? What if it gets stolen? Is it going to be used as a toy or a tool? Would it be loud enough for Sam to hear? Does Sam have the key skills to use the device? I thought, “Seriously? Nooks and Kindles are allowed in our general education classes. What about our children in special education?” Frustrated, I stood up and voiced my opinion of unfairness and told them how the “rule makers” do not truly know or understand the needs of our children with disabilities. They do not live with our children everyday and they do not teach our children during a 7-hour school day. When all was said and done, I remained calm and level-headed but felt extremely disappointed!

Sam is using the Dynavox M3 for now. In order for AT to recommend and provide support for any device like the iPad, John and I were informed that the district needs data to support the decision. If they would give Sam a chance they would see Sam’s face light up when she works with the iPad and they would already have their data and I wouldn’t be writing this story. Sam is enthusiastic, curious and engaged with the iPad. She loves computers. She does wonderfully with cause and effect activities, she can use her fingers to draw on the iPad and I know with time, patience and practice she can learn so much more.

I am still working on this issue with the district. Anyone who knows me also knows that I do not give up and I am quite persistent. After a very recent inquiry, I learned today that the iPad will “probably” become more prevalent with students in our district, however, it will be based on an assessment to determine the need and appropriateness of the technology. I don’t think this is a “no” to the iPad for Sam but it’s not a “yes” either so I have much more work to do.

I don’t expect a “miracle” when Sam uses the iPad. I just believe in her and I know she can learn to use it. WHAT IF she could recognize that she is “Sam” or that I am “Mommy” or is able to recognize “Daddy” on an iPad? Camilla made me think about this after she read my first guest contribution and sent me a private, heartfelt message. How cool would that be? Aren’t we all deserving of such a gift?

I know I probably wear out the school administrators and they might want to run in another direction when they see me coming because I am always creating new ideas or asking for something. If I do wear them out it is only because I love and care about Sam – HEAPS!

Deep in my heart I am an optimist so I know this WILL happen for Sam. One day, very soon, she WILL have her own voice with an iPad and I will let you all know when this happens.

If you haven’t seen the video “Becoming Han Solo” or read Owen’s story it is definitely worth your time to click on this link: http://www.nytimes.com/2010/10/31/nyregion/31owen.html
WARNING: Grab a tissue. 🙂

XO Monica

(If you would like to share this with your Facebook Friends you can do that here! Thanks everyone!!)

Valentines for Voices


Hurry y’all!  No time to spare on this one.  Need to get these mailed on Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday of next week (February 7, 2011).  Those of you in Reno have a bit more time as we can hand deliver for ya! 😉

**These Valentine-Grams will be hand made by Fairy Princess Lillian Darnell**

Fairy Princess Lillian

3 Versions of Valentines to choose from – $5, $25, $50 –

$5 Valentine: Your sweetheart, friend, parent or child will receive a Valentine-Gram via email with a special message from you and us letting them know you helped purchase a voice for someone with communication disabilities.

$25 Valentine: Your sweetheart, friend, parent or child will receive a Valentine-Gram via US Mail with a special message from you and us letting them know you helped purchase a voice for someone with communication disabilities.

$50 Valentine: Your sweetheart, friend, parent or child will receive a Valentine-Gram AND a silver plated pewter pendant prayer box via US Mail with a special message from you and us letting them know you helped purchase a voice for someone with communication disabilities.

Round Prayer Box

Cylinder Prayer Box


Valentine Options