A Glimpse at a Different Family

(Guest Contributor Alisha Marie Peters – Alisha blogs at The Moments That Change Everything)

Being a parent of a special needs child, I know that people often wonder about us. I know that we are often looked at with pity, and this saddens me the most, because we are in on “the secret”…. having these special little souls we’ve been lucky enough to raise has given us an inside scoop on the meaning of  what life is really all about.

Sure it’s hard sometimes, because there are certain things that definitely set us apart from “typical” families….

We spend our money on very different things- therapy, medications, medical equipment, adaptations to our homes and vehicles, special food (formula), countless medical bills!

Taking a trip anywhere is very different…. especially vacations. And I could never dream to take a vacation somewhere with my husband and leave my girl with someone. Couldn’t expect anyone to do the stuff we do…. administering her dozen or so medications everyday, including one by injection. Making her special formula and prepping it for her g-tube because she can’t eat much by mouth and is severely allergic to a lot of foods. And heaven forbid if that tube comes out of her stomach (and unfortunately it does… a lot!), her dad and I are the only ones who have ever replaced it. And then there’s the worry that something would go wrong- when she gets sick… it’s different…. a lot of the time she needs a hospital stay… But we do take vacations…. we just take our girl and half our home with us!

We see our kids get left out a lot…. but that’s why we try harder to make up for that.

But we have learned to appreciate things a lot more. Sure all parents are excited when their kids hit certain milestones, but for us, when a lot of us have been told that there’s a chance our kids might not do these things… then it’s like moving mountains to us.

We also appreciate every moment of every day, because a lot of us don’t know how much time we’ll have with these precious kids. Every day truly is a miracle.

My daughter makes life easier with her attitude. She is honestly the happiest child I have ever known, and being in the education field, that is really saying something! It is remarkable to me that despite the fact that she goes through way more than most would in a lifetime, she still has the best attitude imaginable! Makes it that much easier for me to have a good attitude too.

So, yes we are different from most families….

But, as you can see we’ve come to the conclusion that different is not so bad!

About Guest Blogger

 

This post was written by a guest contributor.  Please see their details on our Contributors page.  If you’d like to guest post for Different iz Good check out our Write for DIG page for details about how YOU can share your stories and tips with our community.

Samantha Enjoys Christmas in a Different Way

(Guest post by Monica McDivitt – Monica blogs at Like a Butterfly)

Samantha is running back and forth in the front hallway. She is flapping her arms and giggling. I watch, smile and walk into the kitchen to prepare breakfast. Suddenly, I hear bells jingling on the Christmas tree. I look over and see the top of the tree moving from side to side. I stop what I am doing and walk over to the family room to see what Sam is up to. Is she pulling an ornament off of the tree? Trying to sit on or tackle the tree? I enter the room. She is wearing her pink and gray leopard print gown. Her hair is messy but it is pulled back into a ponytail. She is sitting quietly in front of the tree, admiring the lights and trinkets. I know she was probably trying to sit on the tree but all is good. She is safe and happy and that is all that matters.

John and I carefully purchased a new tree this year because Sam had mangled the old tree. After 4 years of being leaned on, sat on and knocked over, half of the lights were no longer operating and the bottom branches were touching the floor. It only took one day before this new tree began to look like the old one, except this one has the multicolored lights instead of the clear ones. John and I figured Sam would enjoy the different colors.

The truth is that Sam doesn’t understand Christmas or any other holiday. She is usually quite easygoing but will run and look for a quiet place to hide if there are too many people around. She will refuse to eat in a large social environment, even if she is at home. For this reason, we miss out on many extended family gatherings. If we do attend, John and/or I have to chase Sam around to make sure she doesn’t grab and eat dirt from houseplants, play with toilet water, break something or go into meltdown mode. I then find myself explaining her behavior(s) to family and/or friends. Though I do not mind educating others about Sam, the ‘chasing around’ and meltdowns are not fun and the only solution to this type stress and chaos is to have holiday events at our own home where Sam can feel safe and disappear into her room if she feels the need to do so.

Sam is sweet, smart, funny and craves her routine. She recognizes that many things are different this time of year so we continue to follow a routine throughout the holidays. I know it sounds dull and boring but John and I must do what is beneficial for Sam. When change does occur we do our best to get her through it successfully. Since Sam is nonverbal and still does not understand how to use communication devices, I often wonder what goes on in her mind. How does she feel? What is she thinking? Is she afraid? I am not sure if these are things I will ever truly know but I have much faith and hope and continue to work with her daily.

For the time being, I know she likes Christmas trees, lights and ornaments. She picks one ornament off of our tree each time she passes and by the end of the night several ornaments are scattered throughout the house and I find myself picking up the same ones every night. I also know that she doesn’t care about presents and never demands anything (except her baths or snacks). It can take several days after Christmas before she is interested in opening a single gift. Tissue paper, bows, tulle, wrapping paper, gift bags are often more interesting than the gifts themselves and this is okay. As long as I see a smile on Sam’s face I know she is content. This is Sam. She is easy to please and John and I are blessed.

{Like this article and want to share with your Facebook Friends? Make sure to press the Like button below!! Thanks y’all!}

About Guest Blogger

This post was written by a guest contributor.  Please see their details on our Contributors page.  If you’d like to guest post for Different iz Good check out our Write for DIG page for details about how YOU can share your stories and tips with our community.

Just a little girl

(Guest post by Alisha Marie Peters – Alisha blogs at The Moments That Change Everything)

I know this blog’s mission is to empower difference, which I am all for… but at the same time; I’m starting to see that my girl is so much like any other 3-year-old girl in so many ways.

Don’t get me wrong, she is different in a lot of ways, but the beauty is, I don’t think she sees that yet. And just this once, I’m not going to focus on what makes her different, even though I love all of her. I’m so proud of who she is and all that she’s accomplished with so much stacked against her, and I really hope she grows up knowing that. And that she embraces who she is, all of who she is, and knows how truly amazing she really is.

But, this time I want to let the world know that in most aspects, my girl is just like yours.

But really, just in the last little while I’ve seen enormous strides in her development, and I’m seeing just a 3 year old girl… just that, a little girl doing things that all little girls do. She hates having her hair done. She loves her independence. She loves school and all her friends there. She is a daddy’s girl through and through. She loves dolls and Minnie Mouse. She laughs at things that are funny, some that I’m even surprised she gets! She loves attention, but at the same time can be really shy until she really gets to know someone. She doesn’t really care for goodbyes. She can throw some amazing diva-esc temper tantrums over not getting her way! And she has an attitude that is much bigger than she is!

And the thing that inspired this whole post, she loves… and I can’t stress that word enough, loves Tangled!! She got it for Easter, and I’m sure has watched it entirely through over 20 times in that short week and a half. She loves the whole thing, but definitely has her favorite parts and songs. Now you may not understand why I think this is such a big thing, or why I’m happy about it. But you see this is something that I thought would never happen for my little girl. I would hear people complain about having to watch this show or that over and over, and secretly I would think how lucky they were that their child had made such an important connection. And I’ll admit that I wasn’t sure if mine ever would.

So yes, I’m “Tangled out” I guess you could say, but I’m so, so happy…. Ecstatic really. I love that she is just a girl some days. She’s a happy, always smiling, wanting her way kind of girl. Didn’t I just describe every 3-year-old diva in America??

Em laying on her butterfly pillow with her favorite doll, watching Tangled

{Like this post? Feel free to “like” it below and share with your Facebook Friends by pressing here! Thanks y’all -Camilla}

About Guest Blogger

This post was written by a guest contributor.  Please see their details on our Contributors page.  If you’d like to guest post for Different iz Good check out our Write for DIG page for details about how YOU can share your stories and tips with our community.

Gift a Voice FUNdraiser – Vino for Voices

Whose ready to have some FUN while at the same time raising money for the Turning Views Foundation, Different iz Good and Gift a Voice?

Clark is our next Gift a Voice Recipient

We’ve got a great time scheduled for Wednesday, March 30th, from 6-8 pm at Kona Gold Coffee and Wine Bar y’all! An informal night of fun, wine, chocolate (Dorinda’s Chocolates to be exact!! YUM) and appetizers.

March 30, 2011, 6:00 – 8:00 p.m.
Kona Gold Coffee & Wine Bar
3304 South McCarran Blvd Reno

Over TWENTY FIVE donations for our over the top awesome raffle!  Ranging from Jewelry to Gift Certificates to Wine to Oil Changes to Massages to Bread Baskets to Chocolate to Limousine services to Dental Exams to Books to Chiropractic Exams and all things in between!!

100% of the event fee goes to our Gift a Voice project.  Kona Gold is donating the space, the wine and the appetizers and Dorinda’s Chocolates is donating the chocolate.  Kona Gold is also donating all their tips for the night to our Foundation!!

Bring your inactive and used iPhones, smart phones and cell phones for donation to our Cell Phone Recycling for a Voice Drive.  Receive (1) One FREE raffle ticket for each phone donated.

Join us and support those in our lives with special needs and those with communication disabilities!

Help us spread the word about our Vino for Voices event by sharing with your Facebook Community and pressing that little ole “Like” button below!! We appreciate it times a million y’all!!

(After check out please print your PayPal receipt as that is your ticket to “taste”!!)


Sponsored and hosted by:

Delicious Mouth Watering Chocolate Provided by:

Bring Your Smile ‘Cause Photography Provided by:

Filming Provided By:

Acceptance of Different

(Guest post by Susan Moran –Learn more about Susan by visiting our Contributors Page)

There are many things to accept in this world. We must accept different people, different cultures, different religions, different points of view, different methods of accomplishing tasks, different schedules, expectations, rules, directions, likes and dislikes and the list goes on and on and on.

In our house, one darling really needs help with accepting different expectations and different methods of accomplishing tasks. She likes sameness—it is comforting to know how and when things will be done. However, as stated above, this is NOT how life really works. So, I am challenged daily to help her embrace and enjoy flexibility. :) To this end, I made up a song/chant with her in the car the other day.

I wrote a song to help IM deal with adjusting her evening schedule to include sitter time. She loves her sitter but still struggles with differences in routines and how things are done. All things should be done Momma’s way, don’t you know?! :) So, here it is.

Izzy’s way, Izzy’s way
I like to do it Izzy’s way
Sometimes it’s dif-fer-ent,
But that’s O. K.,
I LIKE to do it Izzy’s way.

We also talk about how this song can help at school, at PT, at doctor’s appts, where ever things are different—we can sing this song and make it a good day. :) It helped that night and another night too. :)

I bet you know some one who could use flexibility training too. :)

What will you do today to embrace, celebrate or help some one with differences?

(We would love to hear your thoughts in the Comment section and if you’d like to share with your friends on Facebook, just press here! – Thanks y’all -Camilla!)

Giving Sam a Voice

(Guest post by Monica McDivitt – Monica blogs at Like a Butterfly)

The Internet, Facebook and computers have been quite a gift to me. Some might criticize and complain that people share too much information or spend too much time “playing” on the Internet but the ability to form new friendships, network with other groups and families of children with and without disabilities, find resources and research from the comfort of my own home have all become invaluable to me. After all, this is how I met Camilla Downs, founder of The Turning Views Foundation and the Different Iz Good™ (DIG) movement and how I was given the privilege to be a contributor for her incredible mission.

Over the past few months, I have been exploring alternative ways to help my 10 year-old daughter, Samantha, to communicate. Sam was born with a chromosome 18q- deletion. As a result she has intellectual and developmental disabilities. Sam is also Deaf, nonverbal and her delayed fine motor skills do not allow her to hold a crayon without assistance.

Sam understands some American Sign Language but has not learned to sign consistently. If she does sign, her sign language is very subtle and if you blink, you will probably miss it. My husband, John, and I have tried several tools and devices over the years to help Sam communicate and participate in her daily and extracurricular activities – the Picture Exchange Communication System (PECS), object schedules and my own pictures with ASL signs are just a few.

In my first DIG contribution I wrote, “Do I wish Sam could speak? Would I love to hear her beautiful voice? You bet! For now, I get giggles, babbles, cries and gestures and if this is all I ever receive as far as communication, I can be happy.” I am true to Sam and still believe everything I wrote but I also know that Sam is an extremely bright child and she really makes me think…a lot! One day, recently, I was playing with Sam, speaking directly into her ear. In a sing-songy voice I kept repeating, “I love you.” Sam sat and listened attentively. She was incredibly engaged and when I least expected it and with a big smile on her face, I heard her vocalize “Ah la la.” I heard Sam say, “I love you” and I suddenly began to want more!

Success stories of the iPad being used with children who have disabilities have been popping up all over the local and world news: A recent New York Times article described the story of 7-year-old Owen Cain who has had a debilitating motor-neuron disease since infancy: “He does not have the strength to use a computer mouse but when a nurse propped her boyfriend’s iPad within reach in June, he did something his mother had never seen before. [Owen] aimed his left pointer finger at an icon on the screen, touched it — just barely — and opened the application Gravitarium, which plays music as users create landscapes of stars on the screen. Over the years, Owen’s parents had tried several computerized communications contraptions to give him an escape from his disability, but the iPad was the first that worked on the first try.”

When I read about and saw this story, I cried, thought about Sam and began to believe that she could be just as successful as Owen. Clearly, Sam’s disabilities are much different than Owen’s but, still, I immediately researched for more stories and articles and then purchased and downloaded the popular communication applications recommended by Camilla onto John’s iPad so we could present this information to Sam’s IEP (Individualized Education Plan) team. I felt so happy.

At our meeting John and I brought the iPad to demonstrate its greatness and how we wanted to help Sam to communicate. The team was impressed, but the reasons against the use of the iPad for Sam at school were: The district won’t allow it. Assistive Technology does not provide support for iPads. What if it breaks? What if it gets stolen? Is it going to be used as a toy or a tool? Would it be loud enough for Sam to hear? Does Sam have the key skills to use the device? I thought, “Seriously? Nooks and Kindles are allowed in our general education classes. What about our children in special education?” Frustrated, I stood up and voiced my opinion of unfairness and told them how the “rule makers” do not truly know or understand the needs of our children with disabilities. They do not live with our children everyday and they do not teach our children during a 7-hour school day. When all was said and done, I remained calm and level-headed but felt extremely disappointed!

Sam is using the Dynavox M3 for now. In order for AT to recommend and provide support for any device like the iPad, John and I were informed that the district needs data to support the decision. If they would give Sam a chance they would see Sam’s face light up when she works with the iPad and they would already have their data and I wouldn’t be writing this story. Sam is enthusiastic, curious and engaged with the iPad. She loves computers. She does wonderfully with cause and effect activities, she can use her fingers to draw on the iPad and I know with time, patience and practice she can learn so much more.

I am still working on this issue with the district. Anyone who knows me also knows that I do not give up and I am quite persistent. After a very recent inquiry, I learned today that the iPad will “probably” become more prevalent with students in our district, however, it will be based on an assessment to determine the need and appropriateness of the technology. I don’t think this is a “no” to the iPad for Sam but it’s not a “yes” either so I have much more work to do.

I don’t expect a “miracle” when Sam uses the iPad. I just believe in her and I know she can learn to use it. WHAT IF she could recognize that she is “Sam” or that I am “Mommy” or is able to recognize “Daddy” on an iPad? Camilla made me think about this after she read my first guest contribution and sent me a private, heartfelt message. How cool would that be? Aren’t we all deserving of such a gift?

I know I probably wear out the school administrators and they might want to run in another direction when they see me coming because I am always creating new ideas or asking for something. If I do wear them out it is only because I love and care about Sam – HEAPS!

Deep in my heart I am an optimist so I know this WILL happen for Sam. One day, very soon, she WILL have her own voice with an iPad and I will let you all know when this happens.

If you haven’t seen the video “Becoming Han Solo” or read Owen’s story it is definitely worth your time to click on this link: http://www.nytimes.com/2010/10/31/nyregion/31owen.html
WARNING: Grab a tissue. :)

XO Monica

(If you would like to share this with your Facebook Friends you can do that here! Thanks everyone!!)

Valentines for Voices


Hurry y’all!  No time to spare on this one.  Need to get these mailed on Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday of next week (February 7, 2011).  Those of you in Reno have a bit more time as we can hand deliver for ya! ;-)

**These Valentine-Grams will be hand made by Fairy Princess Lillian Darnell**

Fairy Princess Lillian

3 Versions of Valentines to choose from – $5, $25, $50 -

$5 Valentine: Your sweetheart, friend, parent or child will receive a Valentine-Gram via email with a special message from you and us letting them know you helped purchase a voice for someone with communication disabilities.

$25 Valentine: Your sweetheart, friend, parent or child will receive a Valentine-Gram via US Mail with a special message from you and us letting them know you helped purchase a voice for someone with communication disabilities.

$50 Valentine: Your sweetheart, friend, parent or child will receive a Valentine-Gram AND a silver plated pewter pendant prayer box via US Mail with a special message from you and us letting them know you helped purchase a voice for someone with communication disabilities.

Round Prayer Box

Cylinder Prayer Box

Valentine Options

Meet Luke T.

(Guest post by Mary Clare Tarpley -  Mary blogs at Mommy Square)

Mary and Luke

When you see my son, Luke, you will first notice his beautiful blue green eyes that sparkle and his amazing dimples. He is simply adorable.  A real cutie patootie!   He looks like other children that are 2.  You can’t tell by looking at Luke, but he struggles to communicate.

Upon closer observation of Luke, you will note that he is often silent and makes very few sounds, some utterances and has about fifteen approximations.  Luke has Childhood Apraxia of Speech.

If Luke could tell you about himself, it would look something like this…

Hi!  My name is Luke.

I live with my mommy, my daddy and my sister Maggie.

I call her “Gee-Gee”.

She is my best friend.

I like trains, balls and puppy dogs.

I love lollipops, popsicles, doughnuts and candy.

I call them “pops” and “yum-yums”.

I like to go to the mall and to Publix.

I love to play outside, go to the park and jump on the trampoline.

I really like to help out around the house.

I don’t like tags on anything.

I am very good at telling you what I want or need without saying a word.

When I can’t get you to understand me, I sometimes get frustrated.

I have lots of visitors and visits during the week for therapy.

Therapy is another word for work.

I get excited about going to “school” and gymnastics.

My favorite family trips have been to Disney.

I try to show my family that I love them.

I cannot wait to be able to tell my mommy, my daddy and my sister…

I love you!

I have been trying to assist the Different Iz Good Foundation with their Gift A Voice project. (http://differentizgood.org/gift-a-voice/) This project helps give children who have speech impairments a means in which to communicate.

It is very dear to my heart because my Luke has Childhood Apraxia of Speech. CAS is a neurological condition that impairs speech.   Although he may know the word or words he wants to say, the motor planning doesn’t work correctly.  We are working to retrain his brain to form these connections for movement with LOTS of therapy and have been given a good prognosis for the future.(http://www.unlockinglukesvoice.com) If you can help in any way with this project, please do.

I try to think of CAS much like a padlock that is keeping Luke’s words contained in a vault (the brain) and that we are the detectives who are trying to figure out the code that will break open the lock on his voice~by helping DIG with the GAV project~you are providing part of the code~almost like being a key. ;)

(Please share this post with your Facebook Friends if you’d like to let them know what we are up to here at DIG! Thanks -Camilla)

Our Daughters Differences Lead Us to Stem Cell Therapy

(Guest post by Maria Barber -  Maria blogs at Mommy You Know What)

We have a little girl named Lila, who is 4 years old.  Through all of her struggles, she has taught my husband and I patience, perseverance, how to love no matter what the circumstances may be, and how to look at the differences in others as blessings.

Lila has cerebral palsy (CP).  CP refers to anything that affects the brain (i.e. lack of oxygen at birth, abnormal growth, missing segments of the brain that had not grown in the womb, genetic abnormalities that have affected the structure of the brain).  This diagnosis is a HUGE umbrella to fall under, so we continued to search, as Lila’s CP is very mild.  Until last November, when her neurologist read over her MRI from 2 years prior and realized that he overlooked a very important fact.  Lila’s cerebellum is smaller than normal.

The cerebellum controls muscle tone, balance, coordination, learning skills, speech, etc. Her differences have mostly been seen in her physical sense, walking with a walker and not being able to stand independently, and in her speech.  Your muscles control speech, nevertheless, she continues to push through and try to use her words in social situations with her peers and teachers.  Hopefully Lila will one day have the confidence to interact at the level of her peers, and process this interaction much more quickly than today.

These differences, along with the promise of stem cell therapy, have led us on this journey of fund-raising to help her to have a stem cell treatment this year, with the promise and hope for more stability and balance, better control and confidence with her speech, and faster processing to keep up with her peers.

Some of you may be thinking…,”she has abnormal growth in her brain, is it really possible that something can help her cerebellum to regain growth and heal?”  YES, and thank goodness!  When anyone has a part of their body that is growing slower than normal, this means that the blood vessels which surround this area are constricted, not bringing enough oxygen to that area.  Stem cells help to regrow/open up those blood vessels to bring more oxygen to that area and promote growth.  Stem cells have also been known to regrow neurons.  Lila’s cerebellum has a chance to grow and get her back on track in the event that we can all give her this gift of stem cell therapy.

Please check out her blog at Mommy You Know What.  This will explain more about our beautiful daughter, her struggles, her smiles, and our fund-raising efforts.  Please join us on our journey, and share our blog with others who may need to see the positive side of the world of special needs.  The beauty is in the eyes of our special children!

I will be sure to drop in again at Different Iz Good and give you all an update as to Lila’s progress.  Look forward to sharing with you all again :-)

Different iz Just Fine

(Guest post by Loni Scovill Smith -  Loni blogs at His Apraxia Journey)

I knew pretty early on that there was something wrong with Ian’s speech. His first “words” were really just a series of grunts. He had a grunt for everything and while it was endearing in the beginning, as new sounds began to emerge, communication with him quickly became a frazzled real life version of the Mattel game Mad Gab. Ian is our third child and although I’d heard all of the excuses from others (“boys are late talkers” “he has older siblings to speak for him”), I felt certain that there was more to his speech difficulties. I talked about Ian’s speech a lot in the beginning. I think I was trying to reach out, looking for some information to grasp onto and I was met with a lot of shoulder shrug responses. To save Ian from having to endure confused looks or being waved off by others, I felt that it was my duty to explain to everyone that he couldn’t talk very well and that he just needed some patience to get his point across. My need to explain paid off one day when a woman said to me, “Ian reminds me of my grandson.” She then proceeded to tell me about her grandson’s diagnosis of Childhood Apraxia of Speech and told me to call the school district to get him some help. Being the avid, obsessive researcher that I am, I spent the next few days on the internet digging around for any information I could find on the condition. I’m sure that by the end of it I looked like one of those red-eyed, unkempt cartoon characters that haven’t had their morning coffee yet. The school district got Ian in immediately for an evaluation. They concluded that he was behind verbally and developmentally and said that he wasn’t even on the charts for his age group. At this point, you’d think I would have cried, but what they told me was something I’d already known in my heart for a long time. Instead of tears, I felt at peace. Finally, there was confirmation that he needed help and he was going to be getting that help. They enrolled him in the developmental preschool for the following Monday and started him in speech therapy. Ian’s diagnosis for Childhood Apraxia of Speech didn’t come for another nine months (in December 2009). His therapist pulled me aside after a session of therapy and mentioned that he might benefit from a communication device. The device – a Dynavox computer – was $8,000.00 and would partially be covered by insurance, but only if we had an official diagnosis. Willing to do whatever it took to help Ian, I agreed to it and his therapist formally gave him the test for Apraxia. This time, I cried, but it was out of pure relief. The diagnosis that I’d been pushing her for was finally becoming a reality. With a diagnosis comes a plan of action – a series of steps to follow to tailor his therapy specific to his condition. The therapist got the paperwork ready while I stressed over the cost of the device. I spent a lot of time praying, talking it over with my husband and confirming with the therapist that this was the best option for Ian. This is where the story gives me goosebumps because I know that God had listened to and answered my prayers. I was playing around on my iPod touch and the idea hit me that I might be able to find some apps with fun games that would help Ian with his coordination. Searching for games turned into searching for flashcards with pictures which turned into searching for educational apps until finally, I stumbled on Proloquo2Go. My fingers started to shake with excitement as I viewed the screenshots – it looked very similar to the software that the Dynavox rep had shown me. I read the reviews, went to the website and called up the therapist. She was just putting our application into the fax machine to send to Dynavox when I told her to hold it right there and then proceeded to talk for ten minutes straight without stopping to take a breath. In short, the therapist (having no knowledge of Proloquo2Go) got excited, talked to her collegues and decided that we should give it a shot. That very night, my husband and I went to Best Buy, purchased an iPod Touch for Ian and downloaded Proloquo2Go. Over the last year, Ian’s speech has improved dramatically. While he is still unclear to most, he has the basic building blocks for speech in his arsenal. A large factor in his improvement was his iPod and Proloquo2Go. “Apraxia is a presumably neurological speech disorder that affects a child’s ability to plan, execute, and sequence the precise movements of the tongue, jaw, lips and palate that are necessary for intelligible speech. Children with (verbal) apraxia are able to hear and understand words; but they have trouble with the motor skill necessary for formulating consonants and vowels into spoken words. While they may have a few words or phrases they can speak clearly – what’s referred to as “pop-outs” – they are unable to imitate what is asked of them. While researchers have several theories, the cause of apraxia is not yet known.” (The Parent’s Guide to Speech and Language Problems by Debbie Feit, pg. 66.) Different iz Good’s Gift a Voice Project is about giving kids more than words. When you donate to Different is Good, you are also giving these kids a better chance at socializing, fitting in and expressing their deepest thoughts. You’re giving them a chance at just being a kid. Did you enjoy this article?  We invite you to share it with your Facebook friends! Thank you!